Vernoia, Enterline + Brewer, CPA LLC

Posts tagged ‘Saver’s Credit’

Put More Money Into ABLE Accounts

Tax reform allows people with disabilities to put more money into ABLE accounts, expands eligibility for Saver’s Credit

People with disabilities can now put more money into their tax-favored Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) accounts and may, for the first time, qualify for the Saver’s Credit for low- and moderate-income workers, according to the Internal Revenue Service. (more…)

Still Time to Contribute to an IRA for 2016

The IRS reminds taxpayers that they still have time to contribute to an IRA for 2016 and, in many cases, qualify for a deduction or even a tax credit. Available since the mid 70s, individual retirement arrangements (IRAs) enable employees and the self-employed to save for retirement. Contributions to traditional IRAs are often deductible, but distributions, usually after age 59½, are generally taxable.

ira (more…)

FAQ: What is the saver’s credit?

Under Code Sec. 25B, a low-income taxpayer can claim a tax credit for a portion of the amounts contributed to an individual retirement account, 401(k) plan, or other retirement plan. A credit is allowed for up to $2,000 of contributions to qualified retirement savings plans. The maximum credit is $1,000 for individuals and $2,000 for married couples. A taxpayer’s credit amount is based on his or her filing status, adjusted gross income, tax liability and amount contributed to qualifying retirement programs. However, the percentage of contributions for which the credit is allowed decreases depending on the individual’s adjusted gross income.

The credit is also reduced for any distributions from qualified retirement plans that the taxpayer, or the taxpayer’s spouse if they file a joint return, has received during the tax year, the previous two tax years, or the period of the following year before the due date for the return on which the return is filed, including extensions. A taxpayer can claim the credit in addition to any other deduction or exclusion that would apply to the contribution. Contributions for which the credit is claimed are treated as after-tax contributions and can be included in the taxpayer’s investment in the contract, thus reducing the amount of income included in distributions from the retirement plan.

Eligible Individuals

The saver’s credit is available for any individual, other than a full-time student, who is age 18 or over at the close of the tax year, provided the individual is not claimed as a dependent for the same tax year. The credit is not available for single taxpayers or married taxpayers filing separately with adjusted gross income (AGI) more than $30,000 for 2014, and $30,500 for 2015; heads of households with AGI more than $45,000 for 2014, $45,750 for 2015; or married taxpayers filing jointly with AGI more than $60,000 for 2014, $61,000 for 2015.

The AGI limits are adjusted annually for inflation. The AGI amounts for single taxpayers are one-half the indexed amounts for married taxpayers filing a joint return, and the limits for heads of households are three-fourths the indexed amounts for married taxpayers filing a joint return. These amounts are adjusted for inflation.

Amount of Credit

The saver’s credit is equal to a percentage, ranging from 50 percent to 0, depending on adjusted gross income (AGI), of the individual’s qualified retirement savings contributions for the tax year, up to a maximum amount of contributions of $2,000. For married taxpayers filing jointly, contributions up to $2,000 a year for each spouse can give rise to the saver’s credit.

Claiming the Credit

Taxpayers claim the saver’s credit on Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, and attach the form to their Form 1040 or 1040A. The instructions for the form indicate how to calculate the credit. The saver’s credit is a non-refundable personal credit. Thus, the amount of the credit is limited by the taxpayer’s tax liability. Taxpayers can also take a projected saver’s credit into account in figuring the allowable number of withholding allowances claimed on Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate.

Many who contribute to retirement savings may still get Saver’s Credit

The IRS recently issued a reminder that there is still time left for low- and moderate-income workers to save for retirement and earn a tax credit for 2014. Eligible taxpayers, including new college grads and others starting out, who contribute to their retirement funds before April 15, 2015, can earn a special tax credit commonly called the “Saver’s Credit.”

The saver’s credit helps offset part of the first $2,000 workers voluntarily contribute to IRAs and 401(k) plans and similar workplace retirement programs. Also known as the retirement savings contributions credit, the saver’s credit is available in addition to any other tax savings that apply.

People have until April 15, 2015, to set up a new individual retirement arrangement or add money to an existing IRA for 2014, the IRS said. However, elective deferrals (contributions) must be made by the end of the year to a 401(k) plan or similar workplace program, such as a 403(b) plan for employees of public schools and certain tax-exempt organizations, a governmental 457 plan for state or local government employees, or the Thrift Savings Plan for federal employees. Employees who are unable to set aside money for this year may want to schedule their 2015 contributions soon so their employer can begin withholding them in January.

The saver’s credit can be claimed by:

  • Married couples filing jointly with incomes up to $60,000 in 2014 or $61,000 in 2015;
  • Heads of Household with incomes up to $45,000 in 2014 or $45,750 in 2015; and
  • Married individuals filing separately and singles with incomes up to $30,000 in 2014 or $30,500 in 2015.